A group of pre-school boys and girls in a classroom. They are participating in a music class.

Musical Progression Map

For Early Years and Primary Schools

EYFS, KS1 and KS2 Progression Map for Music Progression

The Progression Map has been developed and designed to show the requirements and recommendations of the National Curriculum in a simple format for schools and teachers. It is a guide to learning outcomes relevant for each year group in 4 strands: Singing, Playing, Creating and Listening.

Although the 4 strands that form the basis of musical activity are separated in the Musical Progression Map, it must be understood that musical development and progression will not occur with them in isolation.

The Progression Map is intended to guide and support – not dictate.

EYFS Statutory Framework for music

Creating with Materials

  1. Safely use and explore a variety of materials, tools and techniques, experimenting with colour, design, texture, form and function
  2. Share their creations, explaining the process they have used
  3. Make use of props and materials when role playing characters in narratives and stories

Being Imaginative and Expressive

  1. Invent, adapt and recount narratives and stories with peers and their teacher
  2. Sing a range of well-known nursery rhymes and songs
  3. Perform songs, rhymes, poems and stories with others, and when appropriate try to move in time with music.

Musically these statements translate as instruments, voices, body sounds, movement, musical form/shape and all the expressive characteristics of music such as volume, pitch, texture etc.

StrandProgression Map Statements
Singing (S)1. Enjoy singing

2. To join in with singing know nursery rhymes, new songs and rhymes using simple actions
Playing (P)1. Play simple untuned and tuned percussion instruments, knowing when to start and stop

2. Handle and play untuned percussion instruments effectively to the pulse and repeat a simple rhythm pattern with confidence

3. Play softly or loudly by following simple hand instructions

4. To have respect for musical instruments
Creating (C)
Improvising
and
Composing
1. Add appropriate sounds to a story
Listening and Understanding
(L)
1. Respond to music through movement

2. To communicate the emotional effect of music (e.g. through words “This is happy/sad/funny music’ or facial expression)

National Curriculum Subject Content for Music – KS1

  1. Use voices expressively and creatively, singing songs and speaking chants and rhymes.
  2. Play tuned and untuned instruments musically.
  3. Listen with concentration and understanding to a range of high-quality live and recorded music.
  4. Experiment with, create and combine sounds
Year 1 Progression Map StatementsYear 2 Progression Map Statements
Singing (S)1. Enjoy singing with others

2. Sing in unison with a small range of notes

3. Show good posture

4. Develop good breath control

5. Sing with a steady pulse
1. Sing loudly and softly with control

2. Sing back simple melodic idea

3. Sing broadly in tune

4. Sing with expression and communicate context of song

5. Join in with actions and story-telling and invent relevant actions
Playing (P)1. Keep a steady pulse with some accuracy, (e.g. through tapping, clapping, marching, playing )

2. Follow simple instructions of how and when to play

3. Play and control long and short, loud and soft and high and low sounds

4. Clap/play syllables of words

5. Copy back simple rhythms

6. Play and explore a variety of classroom instruments
1. Join in and stop as indicated

2. Respond to musical cues (e.g. loud, soft, fast, slow)

3. Repeat longer rhythmic patterns

4. Clap back a different simple rhythm

5. Respond to and understand a basic form of pitch and rhythm notation (e.g. simple traditional notation, graphic notation)

6. Play on pitched an unpitched instruments with appropriate technique

7. Show awareness and blend with others when performing
Creating
(C)

Improvising
and
Composing
1. Make simple musical choices in response to a story or topic e.g., type of sound, how loud, fast, and when to play1. Create a simple short repeating musical idea

2. Choose suitable instruments to represent objects /moods/feelings

3. Create a simple rhythmic part with others playing (e.g. ostinato, drone)
Listening and Understanding
(L)
1. Respond to changes in tempo and dynamics ( loud /soft ) through movement e.g. marching, big/small gestures 

2. Make physical movements that represent sounds (e.g. move like a snake, an elephant, grow like a tree in response to music).

3. Describe music using adjectives, spiky, spooky, sad, happy etc.

4. Identify at least 3 instruments by name and sound
1. Show (through movement) and describe how elements change (e.g. music gets faster or louder)

2. Begin to show and awareness of different genres (e.g. Where might we hear this music? Lullaby, party, festival)

3. Identify where elements change (e.g. music gets faster or louder)

National Curriculum Subject Content for Music – Lower KS2

  1. Play and perform in a) solo and b) ensemble contexts, using voices and instruments.
  2. Improvise and compose.
  3. Use and understand a) staff and b) other notations.
  4. Listen to and appreciate a wide range of music from a) different traditions and from b) great composers and c) musicians.
  5. Have an understanding of the history of music.
Year 3 Progression Map StatementsYear 4 Progression Map Statement
Singing (S)1. Sing with appropriate phrasing/breathing

2. Sing with a larger range of notes

3. Sing in two parts (e.g. a round in a large group)

4. Sing with clear diction

5. Sing songs from different musical genres/cultures (e.g. rock, folk, traditional, historical, lullaby, African chant, Gospel, Raga, Hymns)
1. Sing with even tone across the dynamic range with clear open vowels

2. Sing with facial expression and good posture

3. Sing a short simple solo

4. Use different voices e.g. talking, whisper, squeaky and monster voice confidently

5. Show awareness and blend with others when singing

6. Demonstrate good performance technique (entry, posture, acknowledgement of audience etc.)
Playing (P)1. Keep a steady pulse

2. Play simple rhythms from traditional notation/graphic notation

3. Demonstrate the difference between pulse and rhythm

4. Play a simple melody solo or in a group

5. Play an accompaniment part (e.g. drone, repeating rhythmic part)

6. Interpret simple graphic score

7. Show awareness and blend with others when performing
1. Self-correct when going out of time

2. Play longer and more complex rhythms

3. Play a simple melody in 2 parts with ‘step by step’ movement

4. Play a selection of simple chords

5. Play showing 2 techniques on an instrument (e.g. Glockenspiel – letting the beater bounce back, vibrato)

6. Follow a conductor adapting to changes in dynamics and tempo
Creating (C)

Improvising and Composing
1. Improvise freely using 3 given notes

2. Clap back a different simple rhythm

3. Create a simple rhythmic passage

4. Create and play a simple graphic score on a theme

5. Create a soundscape or story – include, pitch, tempo and a start/ending
1. Improvise in time using given notes

2. Create a longer rhythm

3. Create a simple rhythmic accompaniment to a melody

4. Layer different rhythms against each other to create a piece of music

5. Collaborate and create a short group piece with a clear structure including introduction, repetition, and ending
Listening and Understanding (L)1. Describe a single piece in terms of tempo, dynamics and mood

2. Identify simple structures (repeating melody, introduction, verse/chorus)

3. Identify simple genres e.g. pop, folk, classical, rap, Bhangra

4. Identify classroom instruments and describe their timbre

5. Identify the difference between pitched and non-pitched instruments
1. Identify and describe different textures, e.g. solo, duet

2. Observe and discuss the music of at least 3 culturally diverse musicians

3. Describe and compare different pieces of music in terms of history, culture and purpose

4. Demonstrate the understanding of pitch through simple notation

5. Listen to music with simple chords

6. Identify common orchestral instruments by sign and sound

National Curriculum Subject Content for Music – Upper KS2

  1. Play and perform in a) solo and b) ensemble contexts, using voices and instruments.
  2. Improvise and compose.
  3. Use and understand a) staff and b) other notations.
  4. Listen to and appreciate a wide range of music from a) different traditions and from b) great composers and c) musicians.
  5. Have an understanding of the history of music.
Year 5 Progression Map StatementsYear 6 Progression Map Statements
Singing
(S)
1. Sing with a range of an octave or more

2. Make adjustments to intonation

3. Breathe without interrupting the musical line

4. Sing songs in two parts that have contrasting melodies and countermelodies
1. Maintain good intonation through whole song

2. Have access to follow music using simple traditional notation

3. Sing with confidence and good communication as a soloist or in a small group

4. Convey the meaning and the context of the song with dramatic interpretation

5. Show and understanding of the etiquette of performance and communicate with confidence to an audience
Playing
(P)
1. Play longer and more complex rhythms in different metres

2. Play a melody with ‘step by step’ movement, small leaps and repetition

3. Play a piece using 2 chords or more

4. Discuss and refine performances, deciding on appropriate tempo and dynamic

5. Experiment with taking control of tempo and dynamics in group playing
1. Play from more complex notations including pitch, dynamic, rhythm and expressive contexts

2. Play more complex rhythms

3. Play a melody with ‘step by step’ movement, larger leaps, repetition and appropriate phrasing/articulation

4. Play a chord sequence

5. Make choices about appropriate blending in an ensemble

6. Show and understand the etiquette of performance and communicate with confidence to an audience
Creating
(C)

Improvising
and
Composing
1. Improvise with call and response ideas

2. Improvise and compose using pentatonic notes over a drone or chord pattern

3. Compose a simple chord sequence

4. Compose a rap with an accompanying rhythm

5. Compose and notate a piece with more than one section. Include musical variations such as texture, dynamic, tempo. This could be in response to story, poem, picture etc.
1. Improvise freely using given notes within a structure e.g. drone, 12 bar blues, beatbox

2. Compose a simple chord sequence and suitable melody

3. Compose an ostinato/riff for an accompaniment

4. Collaborate, compose and notate a song with more than one section
Listening and Understanding
(L)
1. Identify a wider range of orchestral and non-orchestral instruments by name sight and sound

2. Listen to and discuss a range of non-western styles ( e.g. Chinese, Indian, African)

3. Compare 2 versions of the same song/music and discuss instruments, tempo

4. Show awareness of simple chord changes and harmony
1. Identify structures within music (e.g. verse, chorus, intro, bridge, repeat etc.)

2. Discuss the differences in texture and music group (e.g. string quartet, orchestra, duet)

3. Use appropriate musical vocabulary to describe particular characteristics (e.g. chords, staccato, forte, riff, bassline)

4. Demonstrate an awareness of the historical development of music

5. Critique own and others’ work, offering specific comments and justifying these